The 10 Most Controversial Religous Movies of All Time

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Hot on the heels of much religious – and anti-religious – uproar over the soon to be released film The Golden Compass, Beliefnet has released their list of the ten most controversial religious movies of all time.

Topping the list is Martin Scorsese’s 1988 film The Last Temptation of Christ, which sparked tremendous controversy over a scene which depicts Jesus imagining himself making love to Mary Magdalene instead of dying on the cross.

I was a little surprised to see Battlefield Earth on the list, it wasn’t really about a religion was it? But I was even more surprised that Stigmata was included. I don’t remember much controversy surrounding that movie, I just remember it being awful!

Anyway, here’s the rest of their list. I guess I’ve got another batch of movies to work my way through!

The Most Controversial Religious Movies of All Time

1. The Last Temptation of Christ
2. Submission
3. The Passion of the Christ
4. Water
5. The Da Vinci Code
6. Stigmata
7. The Birth of a Nation
8. Battlefield Earth
9. Dogma
10. The Exorcist

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5 thoughts on “The 10 Most Controversial Religous Movies of All Time

  1. well, battlefield earth was written by l. ron hubbard, and plays into that whole crazy alien “hidden secret” of scientology. and i’d think that the exorcist might be a bit higher, considering the most disturbing image in film history might be the scene w/ the crucifix, and…you know. but where’s the life of brian!??! or any of the number of films that have come out, and sucked, about pedophilic priests?!?! and there was one, called “the pope must die”, but i’ve never seen it, just heard of it. intersting.

    so what’s the hubbub bub w/ the golden compass? all i know is there’s a polar bear involved, so i’ll see it, and my friend sarah loves the book.

  2. According to what I’ve read, the book is written by an atheist and the point of the story is that they are trying to kill God.

    The atheists are mad that the “God” elements have been removed(ish), and the Christians are mad that in the story people try to kill God. Which apparently is more offensive than stories about people actually killing God. 😆

    Ah yes, “the crucifix scene.” *Shudders*

  3. Interesting list of movies… I have to admit that I really enjoyed The DaVinci Code. It reminded me of National Treasure. Both movies take partial truths and go nuts with a fictional story written around those subjects. I still am surprised at how many Christians are disturbed by the”Code” since it is a piece of fictional writing.

    The thing about The Golden Compass is that I’ve read quite a bit of non-biased information about it and the author. Basically, the author has been quoted as saying that his hope is that children see the movie, love it so much that they ask their parents to buy the trilogy for them to read. He has been quoted as saying that he hates the C.S. Lewis allegorical stories and that he wanted to give children an alternative view. His books all deal with the subject of an unjust and senile God, who oppresses his subjects and whom is killed by “Adam and Eve,” two children, in the third book. The author is a self-professed atheist who absolutely does not believe in God and “wants children to see his movie, read his books and decide for themselves that there is no God.” He is also quoted as saying that most [Christian] parents do not pay attention to what their children are watching or reading and that his books are a way to get his message of atheism to them so that they can make an educated decision against God, in spite of what their parents are teaching them.

    As I see it from a spiritual aspect, the movie/books are a way to expose children to an alternative message that there is no God. I put them in the same category as the Harry Potter books/movies. Both masquerade as “light” with alternative messages that children alone control their own destiny. I know that many Christian parents will argue up one side and down the other that the Potter books are good fun and that there is nothing “harmful” in them. But as a person who was lured into the occult at age 11, I found the first movie to have enough occult truths in them that it disturbed me that it was being played to children.

    All I can say is that Christian parents need to be smart about what they want their children exposed to. Whether they see the Compass/Potter books and movies as a threat or not, they should watch and read them first before blindly handing them over to their children. The scripture “train up a child in the way they should go, and when he is old he shall not depart from it” can go both ways depending on what message the child grasps onto. I know that after spending wasted years of my youth chasing after the occult, I wished that my parents had paid closer attention to what I was reading when I was young.

    (PS-In case anyone is interested, my “introduction” to the occult came in the form of a pre-teen “fan” publication. Mostly it was filled with pictures of teeny-bopper “heart-throbs,” but there was this one issue… it contained a very in-depth article on “how to tell if you are a witch.” It included spells, details and descriptions on white witchcraft. The “test” to see if you were a witch was generic enough that anybody would pass. But for a pre-teen girl looking for something to grab a hold to, I was hooked. I started reading about the occult in my school and local libraries. All my parents ever knew was that I was studying. I learned about familiars, talsmans and “white” spells in a very short time. I started learning how to read cards and by the time I got to high school, I considered myself a white witch. Praise God that I was finally saved from that when I was 17.)

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