Couldn’t “Bee” worse…

Josiah and I were looking to kill a little time on Saturday afternoon while mom did some shopping, so I decided to go take him to see Bee Movie. Unfortunately, our time died a slow and painful death.

Here’s my brief review: The animation was blah, the story was painfully uninspired, and it was occasionally funny at best.

Here’s Josiah’s review: “Did you like the movie buddy?” Yeah. “What was your favorite part?” I don’t know. “Can you tell me anything that happened in the movie?” No.

He liked it (then again, he likes everything) but he wasn’t that excited about it. I’m willing to accept that I may be too critical of a movie geared toward kids. But my kid is a kid, and he found it utterly forgettable.

After seeing the movie, I’ve drawn two conclusions:

1) The more they market a movie, the more likely it is to suck. Especially when they continue to pour on the advertising long after opening weekend, when word of mouth typically goes to work for the good films.

2) The emergence of CGI animation has opened up the floodgates for a lot of films that would have probably never made it to the big screen 10-15 years ago. I have a really hard time believing that movies like this and “Surf’s Up” would have been anything other than direct to video releases if they were hand-drawn animation.

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13 thoughts on “Couldn’t “Bee” worse…

  1. #2 is a very insightful observation. I think the 1990’s gave us the one-two punch of public acceptance of ugly, NickToons-style character design and the advent of cheaper CG animation production. The result is a glut of animated shows and features that are often the centerpiece of a marketing campaign rather than the creative product of a talented individual or studio.

    It’s like talent in the areas of design, animation, and filmmaking are no longer prerequisites for making animated films.

  2. And speaking of “talent” in animated film making…

    Whoever though Jerry Whinefeld should be considered as a voice talent should be dragged into the public square and flogged.

  3. Whoever though Jerry Whinefeld should be considered as a voice talent should be dragged into the public square and flogged.

    In this case, I believe that person is Jerry Whinefeld himself. This was a vanity project of his, and apparently he considers himself an “animation guy” now.

    One of my biggest gripes with modern animated films are celebrity voices. Other than names on a poster, just what is the value of celebrity voices in an animated films? There is a large community of very talented voice over artists who are experienced at giving life to animated characters. The animation process is about creating the illusion of a believable character, and familiar voices can undermine that in a big way.

    Pixar does an OK job at utilizing celebrities and not marketing their movies based on their presence in the movie.

  4. There is a large community of very talented voice over artists who are experienced at giving life to animated characters. The animation process is about creating the illusion of a believable character, and familiar voices can undermine that in a big way.

    That’s an interesting point. I can’t think of a single time I’ve made a decision to see an animated film based on who did the voice work. I think there was a novelty to Tom Hanks and Tim Allen with the first Toy Story. But that’s completely worn off by this point.

    And to think of all the jobs that the “A-listers” have snaked from voice talent. Ironic. There’s an unprecedented amount of animated work in the marketplace, but the one group that should benefit most (voice talent) isn’t getting the work.

  5. Prominent voice artists like Billy West and Tress MacNeille (both of Futurama) are quite vocal about Hollywood celebs stealing their work. (Vocal! Get it?!)

    Speaking of Futurama, the new DVD is out tomorrow!

  6. Speaking of Futurama, the new DVD is out tomorrow!

    Would you believe that until last week I couldn’t recall having ever watched an episode of Futurama? I borrowed a random disc of four episodes from the library and kicked myself for missing the boat for this long.

    I completely disagree all the way around.

    I’m not surprised. For as many times as our tastes overlap, there’s tons of times I think we’re from different planets.

  7. In most cases people think I’m from a different planet. I like call myself an enigma because I’m very hard to nail down.

    It’s not easy being me! ๐Ÿ™‚

    ps. I’m working on getting you those movies this week. I’ll email you about the address to send to here soon.

  8. I agree with you Shane…totally forgettable. The best part about the whole deal is the cute little baby bee honey containers they are selling in the grocery market. I didn’t even realize-at first- it was a movie tie-in dealeo. I’m hoping to get one in my Christmas stocking. (Can Santa find you if your home has 5 wheels and one of them is “steering”?)

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