The 12 Tunes of Christmas – Day 9

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Only David Bazan could turn a joyful holiday favorite into an existential crisis. Sound doctrine, fond memories of family traditions and questioning one’s faith over a stiff drink. Yup, at various points in my life I can relate to it all!

David Bazan – God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen

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6 thoughts on “The 12 Tunes of Christmas – Day 9

  1. brilliant. His (apparent) spiritual demise is one of the great musical disappointments of my life, but this song is him at his gut-wrenching, miserable best.

  2. His (apparent) spiritual demise is one of the great musical disappointments of my life …

    I meant to reply to this when it was first posted, but forgot. And now I’m sure this comment will be lost in the shuffle. (It came to mind as I was listening to Bazan in my car today.)

    I can’t help but wonder if too much is being made of David Bazan’s “spiritual demise.” You’re not the first person I’ve heard express their dissapointment.

    I try to remember that he’s an artist, and a particularly (brutally) honest one at that. If he’s going through a drought, I would expect his music to reflect those feelings of abandonment, doubt, self-loathing, etc. I’ve also heard that he’s been saying at shows that he is unsure about his faith, like he’s lost sight of God or something. He’s obviously going through some stuff.

    “Fire will test the quality of each man’s work.”

    That’s why I see a silver lining. Despite all his doubts, feelings of separation, etc. he said at a recent show that most of his songs were about God, and he was getting sick of that, “but what are you going to do?” I take that to mean, “It’s still here, a part of me that I’m having to deal with and work through.”

    Sound like his namesake much?

    When we look at many of David’s psalms we see a man broken, questioning, doubting, feelling abandoned. It’s only because we have the benefit of being able to see David’s complete body of work that we don’t read those things and feel like we need to have an intervention.

    If God ever began a “good work” in David Bazan’s life, he will “carry it on to completion.”

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