No Bailouts. No Recalls.

Dear Ford Motor Company:

Please feel free to use this as your next billboard campaign. Free of charge.

Please remember me the next time you have an opening in marketing.

Sincerely,

Shane

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6 thoughts on “No Bailouts. No Recalls.

  1. I drive a ’95 Honda Civic with 218,000 miles on it. (My wife drives the “good car,” the ’98 with 121,000). I’ve had a slow oil leak for some time that I’ve had to keep on top of. But it has completely slipped my mind all winter.

    I checked the oil the other day and it was bone dry. Not even a drop on the dip stick. Who knows how long it’s been without oil. It’s a miracle the engine didn’t seize up. I filled her up with oil and she’s still purring like a kitten.

    When a Chevy can do that … I’ll buy American.

  2. The car I drive to work is an Olds Intrigue ’98 with 246,000 miles on it. This car has from day one used oil and the rate is consistent at around 1 quart per month. I always check fluids though so it wouldn’t come to a point where I have to get lucky but in those cases Honda must be the way to go. The other thing to remember is even if there is none on the dip stick as long as there is still some in the crankcase you may have enough to keep your engine lubed. That dipstick just measures around the first quart of oil in the car and in your cars case it should have around 4 quarts total so you may have been better off than you think.

  3. I saw a 2010 Taurus the other day on the road and couldn’t believe it was a Taurus. It looks awesome.
    I talked to the couple at the rest stop and they said it’s great. My exact quote was, “good for Ford.”
    I had a 1996 Taurus that was an awesome car. The new one looks alot less Granny-ish but hopefully has the same reliability the original Taurus had.
    (Now on to the political…why did we need the bailout again?!)

  4. So that the Government could become the primary stock holder and bully Toyota by launching a Congressional investigation into the safety of their product … thus shaking American confidence in the Toyota brand in hopes of eventually improving the public trust in GM automobiles and regaining their status as the #1 car company in the US.

    Duh!

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