Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome

Dr. John C. Sanford is a retired Cornell professor with a PhD in plant breeding and plant genetics. He was one of the featured speakers at the recent “Veritas Exchange” series at RIT.

As someone whose scientific pursuits were a catalyst in him making the swing from being an atheist to creationist he is – as one would imagine – a bit of an anomaly in the scientific community.

This is a two-part interview that begins to explore his thesis titled Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome. I thought it might be an interesting thing to share as I know many of my friends spend a great deal of time thinking about the topics of evolution, intelligent design and creation.

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2 thoughts on “Genetic Entropy and the Mystery of the Genome

  1. He’s saying most mutations alter a single nucleotide base and so are too small for natural selection to detect, allowing deleterious mutations to accumulate and corrupt ~1-5% of the information in each generation.

    But surely a 1-5% loss of information isn’t a tiny base change, but something much larger which evolution can thus grab a hold of and select for/against.

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